The Recovery of the Bald Eagle: How the First EPA Administrator and a Forest Service Biologist Saved Our National Symbol

Two adults in “West Bay” in Gogebic County, Michigan.   Credit: Rachel Eberius, MS student of Bill Bowerman

Two adults in “West Bay” in Gogebic County, Michigan.
Credit: Rachel Eberius, MS student of Bill Bowerman

Bill Bowerman, Professor and Chair
Department of Environmental Science and Technology, UMCP

This is the story of how William Ruckelshaus, the First USEPA Administrator, and John Mathisen, the Forest Wildlife Biologist on the Chippewa National Forest, working independently, were the two people most responsible for saving bald eagles.  One is known for banning a number of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) from use in the environment, the other for developing a series of land management actions that protected the eagles’ nesting habitat. Continue Reading »The Recovery of the Bald Eagle: How the First EPA Administrator and a Forest Service Biologist Saved Our National Symbol

Robert Fischell: Presidential Honoree, Colleague

By William Bentley
Robert  E. Fischell Distinguished Professor
Director, Robert E. Fischell Institute for Biomedical Devices

Presentation of award to Robert Fischell.   White House photo

Presentation of award to Robert Fischell.
White House photo

At the end of last semester on May 19, 2016, University of Maryland Professor of Practice Dr. Robert E. Fischell was recognized by President Barak Obama as a recipient of the highest honor for technological achievement bestowed by the White House, the National Medal of Technology and Innovation. The awards ceremony took place at the White House and was covered by several news agencies; I have provided the following links to the Clark School news story and to a comprehensive, endearing, and even witty 11-minute interview by ABC News’ Alex Mallin (http://www.eng.umd.edu/html/news/news_story.php?id=9495; http://abcnews.go.com/Health/video/meet-87-year-genius-inventor-credited-saving-millions-39237985). I was invited to prepare these few words for the Faculty Voice so that our campus community might learn a bit about Bob and the impact he’s had on the campus, which might not otherwise be covered in newscasts. Continue Reading »Robert Fischell: Presidential Honoree, Colleague

Voices: Jennifer Browne

Strays

Blending bowls of kibble, of fish and rice,
a man feeds lean street dogs
that slink to their appointed heaps.
Stronger, now, and nourished, they’ll
soon fatten with inevitable pups.

Where you’re concerned, my plate
will never be my own, but each
of us, some days, is wary, baring canines.
On other days, we walk away,
bandages around our bitten hands.

Stable Hand

Excluding the rooster and hen,
the animals in the Fisher Price barn
were not paired by gender.
You could tell the rooster by his comb,
but the hen wore no blush;
hens don’t.

The practical lashes of the black horse
were neither long nor sultry,
not the smoky cat eyes that stare surely
from the cellulose pens of My Little Pony.

Those ponies, too, used to be chubby,
with friendly, rounded faces
and friendly, rounded rumps,
their diet all sprinkles and happiness,
but like Strawberry Shortcake,
like Holly Hobbie and the Care Bears,
they’ve had a little work done. Now they’re leggy and slinky
and lean, sexy ponies
sold to girls age 3 and up.

Easter Island

Prior to their vanishing,
the Easter Islanders
decimated what
lay before them,
drove themselves to ruin
and, eventually,
to cannibalism.
We eat,
we alter,
we turn on each other.
So, too, for introduced species:
what there is to eat is devoured,
the other species adapt or die.

Surprised, researchers in the Yukon
observed red squirrels
killing and feeding
on tender young hares.
On my morning walk,
a grey squirrel,
inattentive to oncoming cars,
hunched, flag-tailed,
gorging on a chocolate bunny
that had fallen on the street.

The bunny mutely
regarded its consumption
with one staring candy eye.

Benediction

“But by a strong effort of will I had no tears.”
St. Augustine of Hippo

The zoo’s mother sloth bear
ate her stillborn cub
and his living sibling,
whose silent parasites
she may have sensed,
in her neglected third cub.

Rising to the window,
I think of St. Monica, patron
of disappointing children,
who wept for her wayward
pagan of a prodigal, St. Augustine.

A mother makes her choices.
In grief, she gnashes, fasts,
or she preens in the sunny grass
while her nest of chicks pecks
the weakest to downy pulp.

Pray for the cubs, the chicks,
for Monica and Augustine,
for my mother, for my child
for those who wish for children,
and for those who sigh with relief
at the month’s first smears of blood.

Jennifer Browne lives with caffeine addiction, importunate curiosity, and an intermittent stutter in Frostburg, MD, where she is the Director of the Frostburg Center for Literary Arts and a Lecturer in English at Frostburg State University.

Athletic Council recommendation on alcohol sales

By Nick Hadley
Chair, UMCP Athletic Council
Department of Physics

In the spring of 2014, University of Maryland student leaders requested that the sale of alcohol at Maryland Athletic events to persons of legal age be permitted. The Athletic Council studied the issue during the 2014-2015 academic year and, in the spring of 2015, voted to recommend that the sale of alcoholic beverages at University of Maryland Athletic events be permitted.

After consultation with the University community, this recommendation received the support of President Loh. Continue Reading »Athletic Council recommendation on alcohol sales

The Joy of Sudden Discovery

By Peter Shawhan
Physics, UMCP

Being a physicist requires patience and a certain kind of faith, especially when you are investigating the fundamental nature of the universe.

This is the research world I live in:  We devise sophisticated experiments that often need extensive coaxing or reconfiguring before they work as intended.  We’re looking in some new way for a result which either fits the current theory under previously unexplored conditions, or else deviates from it in a small but significant way.  Usually we just get the results we expected, and only our colleagues who do similar research find that interesting.  If we do measure a deviation or record an unexpected signal, we have to figure out whether it’s due to some equipment problem or an overlooked systematic error before we can claim to have found something meaningful.  That is often the hardest part of the research. Continue Reading »The Joy of Sudden Discovery

Book Review: Locus of Authority; The Evolution of Faculty Roles in the Governance of Higher Education

By Gerald (Jerry) Miller
Emeritus, Department of Chemistry

Just weeks after the surprise of a large state budget cut for the University in August 1990, I was elected Chair-Elect of the University Senate. I was Senate Chair in Spring, 1992, when the Senate voted to close one college, a half-dozen departments, and over two dozen academic programs. I know that excellent communication and close cooperation between the academic administrators of the University and the Senate governance structure were key factors in making the best possible decisions in those very difficult times.  Very talented and dedicated-to-the-University faculty members worked on the administrative reviews and on the Senate PCC (Programs, Curricula, and Courses) Committee reviews of academic units and academic programs considered for closure, providing the basis for the Senate’s consideration of these actions.  Many of the advances in academic quality that the University has made after this traumatic period benefitted from such collaborative governance processes. Continue Reading »Book Review: Locus of Authority; The Evolution of Faculty Roles in the Governance of Higher Education

New Pathways in College Mathematics Courses

By Denny Gulick
Professor of Mathematics
UMCP

During the past few years there has been a shift away from algebra courses as a first college mathematics course.  There even was a controversial article “Is Algebra Necessary” in the New York Times in 2012, written by the sociologist Andrew Hacker.  Whereas in the past, many institutions, have required a college-level algebra, recently many such institutions (such as Michigan State University) have changed the general-education mathematics requirement.   Continue Reading »New Pathways in College Mathematics Courses

Responses to Effectiveness and Efficiency 2.0

In the Endless Pursuit of Cost Savings

By Nelly P. Stromquist
International Education Policy
College of Education, UMCP

Close to the end of past academic year, the Faculty Voice (April 2016) published a statement by Dr. Don Spicer, chief information officer of the University System of Maryland, who announced efforts by USM to embark in its next phase of cost savings (“E&E20.0”).  In his article, Dr. Spicer referred to previous savings over a recent 10-year period that had produced significant cost reductions in “technology, libraries, and academic initiatives.” Going back to that precursor of the current phase, we learn that the savings from 2003 to 2013 were $356 million dollars. Continue Reading »Responses to Effectiveness and Efficiency 2.0

Images: Eagles

Eaglet.  Photographer Teryl Grubb

Eaglet. Photographer Teryl Grubb

Kendall Simon at eagle nest.   Photographer: Walter Neser

Kendall Simon at eagle nest.
Photographer: Walter Neser

Rachel Eberius holding eagle nestling.   Photographer: Bill Bowerman

Rachel Eberius holding eagle nestling.
Photographer: Bill Bowerman

Kendall Simon at eagle nest.   Photographer: Walter Neser

Kendall Simon at eagle nest.
Photographer: Walter Neser

Rachel Eberius holding eagle nestling.   Photographer: Bill Bowerman

Rachel Eberius holding eagle nestling.
Photographer: Bill Bowerman

Eaglet with 11 turtle shells.  Photographer Kendall Simon

Eaglet with 11 turtle shells.
Photographer Kendall Simon

Rachel Eberius holding eagle nestling.  Photographer: Bill Bowerman

Rachel Eberius holding eagle nestling. Photographer: Bill Bowerman

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Photos at research sites of Bill Bowerman in Upper Peninsula, Michigan.  Pictured individuals are current/previous students of Bill.

 

 

President Thompson of Coppin State University—One Year In

President Maria Thompson.   Courtesy of Coppin State University

President Maria Thompson.
Courtesy of Coppin State University

Coppin State University is one of the institutions in the University of Maryland System, located in northwest Baltimore.  President Maria Thompson is completing her first year in the office, and offers her reflections on Coppin and her year in her office.

On July 1, 2015, I assumed the position as Coppin State University’s 7th and its first woman president in the university’s now 116 year history.  Chancellor Caret and I share the same start day. His was a reunion with a system in which he had spent many years; mine was a beginning to my new life in Maryland.

It was roughly this same time last year, April 2015, as I contemplated the decision to accept my current post as president of Coppin State University, that the unrest in Baltimore’s West side unfolded.  CNN and other media outlets converged on Baltimore and showed the city and the location of Coppin’s campus in less than a flattering light.    Fortunately, I knew better.  As a graduate of Tennessee State, not unlike Coppin, an HBCU located in an urban setting, I knew the vital role of a strong anchor institution to serve students and the community. Continue Reading »President Thompson of Coppin State University—One Year In

The Multiple Faces of Academic Productivity

By Nelly P. Stromquist
College of Education, University of Maryland

We live in an era of wondrous inventions. Life expectancy has increased by 25 years since 1975.  Over the past two decades, we have decreased extreme poverty from 35% to 10% of the world’s population.  Our understanding of the brain increases every day.  Many of these positive developments are associated with research universities, and US universities rank among top in the world.  By 2014, however, close to 43 American states had announced major cuts to higher education due to insufficient public resources.  Ironically, chronic underfunding of public universities is forcing them to restructure themselves in ways that damage their missions and diminish the value of university professors. Continue Reading »The Multiple Faces of Academic Productivity

Competitive Chess at UMBC: The Legacy, The Future

By Dr. Alan T. Sherman
Director, UMBC Chess Program
Professor of Computer Science
sherman@umbc.edu

Entering the sixth and final round of the 1996 Pan-American Intercollegiate Team Chess Championship (Pan-Am) in Baltimore, with UMBC’s A and B Teams tied at five points, one point ahead of the rest of the field, a showdown between UMBC’s top two teams would determine the best college chess team in the Americas.  With that dramatic unique finish—covered by CNN Headline News—UMBC’s A Team won its first Pan-Am Championship, the foremost intercollegiate team chess championship in North, Central, and South America, and the Caribbean.  From 1996 to 2012, UMBC won a record six national collegiate titles and ten Pan-Am championships.  UMBC is the only school to have qualified for every Final Four (top four USA schools from Pan-Am), for fifteen years from the Final Four’s inception in 2001 through 2015. Continue Reading »Competitive Chess at UMBC: The Legacy, The Future

Mind the Gap: Patterns in the Academic Careers of Underrepresented Minority Faculty

By Kimberly Griffin
Associate professor
Department of Counseling, Higher Education and Special Education at the University of Maryland
and
Ellin Scholnick
Professor Emerita of Psychology
Chair,  President’s Commission on Women’s Issues

Despite significant increases in the diversity of undergraduate and graduate students in the United States, the underrepresentation of African Americans and Latinos among tenured and tenure track (TTK) faculty continues to be a challenge. According to the data collected for the IPEDS  (Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System produced for the National Center for Educational Statistics) database of all U. S. degree-granting institutions, African Americans comprised 5% of TTK faculty and Latinos 4% in 2013. Similar national data have been reported over the past 40 years; the representation of African American and Latino faculty has marginally increased. Statistics also suggest that members of these two underrepresented groups travel different career paths from white and Asian faculty.  The percentage of white and Asian faculty who are associate or full professors far exceeds the percentages for Latino and African American faculty, and these differences are particularly pronounced for women. Continue Reading »Mind the Gap: Patterns in the Academic Careers of Underrepresented Minority Faculty

Voices: Leslie Harrison

Snowfields

And I wonder sprawled on the curved recurved back
of the hill the towers of clouded sky crushing the horizon
flat I want to know how to strip the griefstorm from the flesh
flense the spirit scrape it down to the clean bone unbreaking
make it take in stride another raw dawn these days of snow
on cold on frozen take in stride this place of glass and ice
this place knit stitched pierced by the shadows of all those
departed birds begin again to assemble linens pillows
blankets scarves the small soft comforts cushions cradles
learn how to lay me down in something other than danger
other than fury ice and risk learn to stop dropping this body
into snowfields making these empty shapes learn to stop
waiting for them to be filled

Failed Love Poem

She asks me to imagine my inner creature my monster
and what I picture is a bare branch old rough and roughly
horizontal black and sharp a little stark no buds no hint
of life no flower anywhere nor any hope of flower I was
trying to write a love poem a poem for you a gift however
useless already it was or might have been so listen
my inner creature is ancient is lovely as a Hiroshige print
is waiting black with rain waiting for the rainy day to turn
rainy night for summer to heel over into another winter
the inner creature in winter is etched in new snow scratched
by small claws where a chickadee puffs up for warmth
the snow in this instance might stand in for white paper
the way he created the moon as absence painted also snow
as fine gestures suggestions at the edges of empty space
my inner creature might it turns out be Japanese might
be alive or dead might well weather another winter
but my inner creature is not talking to you any longer
my inner creature is a little in love with birds with the small
winter birds the way they cling their habits of chirp and sky
my inner creature is a branch in winter and you are not
the snow not the sun most surely not the rain listen I was
trying to write a love poem a poem for you but my inner
monster loves instead even the most ordinary weather
loves the weather more loves it better

Sirens
I’m not Penelope married to faith married to waiting
bound in fine soft strands of silk dyed and stretched
in my world longing has teeth and fins has a taste
for blood longing is a room built entirely of knives
all edges facing in all points afire and also somehow
held to the vessel in my world sirens are the town criers
saying something’s happened and maybe to you saying
someone got too close to danger sirens are the past tense
of rescue meaning clean-up in aisle three where
the glass racks have fallen before the mast where the sea
rose up between the meat and the waiting where the bed
refused as usual to become the boat where the dead
drape and tangle in the rigging the sheets in the loom
and the sirens gather to wail flicker and shine they
gather together to sing of damage to sing us home

Poems © Leslie Harrison

Leslie Harrison is an Assistant Professor in the English Department at Towson University.  Her second book, The Book of Endings, is forthcoming from the University of Akron Press. Her first book, Displacement, was published in 2009. Recent poems have appeared in The Kenyon Review, The New Republic, Orion and elsewhere. More information, and links to published work, can be found at her website, leslie-harrison.com

In loco parentis Gone Loco

By Rod Jellema
Professor Emeritus of English

I saw notice the other day of how the English Department at the University of Maryland now handles matters of the use of alcohol on campus. It stirred up memories of my own tenure there. Back then, the idea of faculty in loco parentis—as stand-in parents—was already as rare as the Latin in which it’s couched. University president Curly Byrd, who had retired the year before I arrived, had eliminated the classics department, apparently satisfied that all such Roman stuff had been translated anyway. Latin would again be taught, whether mom and dad were advocates or not, but to a scant few elitists. Meanwhile the campus moved with history on its way toward near-riots, co-ed dorms, and binge drinking. Clearly a call for tighter supervision. Continue Reading »In loco parentis Gone Loco

Nurses Gain Ability to Practice to Full Scope of License

By Jane Kirschling, PhD, RN, FAAN
Dean and Professor, School of Nursing, University of Maryland
Director, Interprofessional Education, University of Maryland, Baltimore

Last May, Maryland became the 21st state to allow Advanced Practice Registered Nurses (APRNs) to practice to the full scope of their licenses, thereby allowing patients to receive all of the services that APRNs are educated and clinically trained to deliver. Signed into law by Governor Larry Hogan, the measure repealed a portion of the Maryland Health Occupations code that required APRNs to list a physician “sponsor” as a condition of licensure so that they could “collaborate and consult” on patient issues.  Continue Reading »Nurses Gain Ability to Practice to Full Scope of License

News and Notes

Biomedical Sciences Preprint Archive

New York Times science reporter Amy Harmon reports (March 15, 2016) on a nascent effort in the biomedical sciences to implement an electronic preprint archive, bioRxiv, modeled on one in the physical sciences, arXiv.org, where researchers rapidly post online preprints before journal publication, which can take months.   It also makes results available to individuals who cannot afford (either personally or via their institution) the cost of the journal. For several reasons, including policies (perceived or real) of prestigious journals, rapid electronic dissemination of research results in the biomedical sciences have been inhibited.   To date, only a minuscule number of preprints have been posted on bioRxiv, but it recently received a boost in credibility and publicity when three Nobel laureates separately posted results there. Continue Reading »News and Notes

Images: Bill Wolff

Artist Statement

When my children are my age, many animals and environments that I grew up thinking were among the most unique and beautiful on the planet will very likely no longer exist.

These gestural, biomorphic abstractions poignantly reflect both beauty and this sense of possible loss. The “heads” have been replaced by an open cone, a form which has evolved from an open mouth and which I have used in my work over the last ten years to as a quiet comment on consumerism. These sculptures are carved, hollowed and assembled from sections of wood with metal leaf on the surface, a variation of the traditional yosegi zukuri process that I studied in Japan. All of this wood was found and otherwise destined to be firewood. Each work is initiated with a chainsaw, jointed with chisel and plane, charred with a torch, scraped and sanded, leafed with metal, brushed with chemicals and then scraped and drawn on. Tool marks from every stage are visible atop the grain of the wood and are a conversation. The surface of the work tells its history. This is the truest way for me to recognize the trees that provide both the material and grounding for my work.

Bill Wolff is on the faculty, and head of the sculpture area, in the Art Department at Salisbury State University. He holds an MFA from Louisiana State University and an MA from the Tokyo University of the Arts. His website is www.billwolff.net

Photos © Bill Wolff

Bellow, 2012, 36”x18”x24”. Cherry, copper leaf.

Bellow, 2012, 36”x18”x24”.
Cherry, copper leaf.

O Ye, 2009, 126”x60”x60”. Camphor, copper leaf. Installation view at Tokyo National University of Fine Arts.

O Ye, 2009, 126”x60”x60”.
Camphor, copper
leaf. Installation view at Tokyo National
University of Fine Arts.

Birdhouse, 2007, 78”x48”x48”. Ginko wood, copper plate. Installation view at Hirakushi Denchu Studio, Tokyo, Japan.

Birdhouse, 2007, 78”x48”x48”.
Ginko wood, copper plate.
Installation view at Hirakushi Denchu Studio
Tokyo, Japan.

Furrow and Eat the Young 2009, Furrow: 62”x120”x48”. Cherry, copper leaf. Eat the Young: 124”x40”x36”. Cherry, copper leaf. Installation view at Tokyo National University of Fine Arts.

Furrow and Eat the Young 2009,
Furrow: 62”x120”x48”. Cherry, copper leaf.
Eat the Young: 124”x40”x36”. Cherry, copper leaf.
Installation view at Tokyo National University of Fine Arts.

Dance, 2015, 18”x14”x12”. Cast iron on padauk base.

Dance, 2015, 18”x14”x12”.
Cast iron on padauk base.

Organ, 2011, 72”x120”x48”. Oak, Japanese maple, copper plate, copper leaf.

Organ, 2011, 72”x120”x48”.
Oak, Japanese maple, copper plate, copper leaf.

Flock, 2012. 30 Elements, each approximately 36”x24”x24”. Installation view of detail at Gallery CoExist, Tokyo, Japan.

Flock, 2012. 30
Elements, each approximately 36”x24”x24”.
Installation view of detail at Gallery CoExist, Tokyo, Japan.

Charge, 2014, 66”x40”x20”. Maple, aluminum leaf, graphite on steel base.

Charge, 2014, 66”x40”x20”.
Maple, aluminum leaf, graphite on steel base.