Why College Park Doesn’t Lead in Computer Science Education

By Jim Purtilo
Computer Science

This article is planned for publication in a future Voice issue.

Advanced genetics enable crops to feed more people and reduce world hunger. New models of brain cells arm researchers to combat dementia, mental illness and neurological disorders at the most fundamental levels. “Big data” opens windows for understanding the past in ways that historians could never have won by classical methods, while educators exploit data analytics to uncover novel pathways to student success.

Achievements like these capture the public’s imagination as people tune in to STEM (science, technology, engineering, mathematics) like never before. This is especially true of young people weighing career choices, which puts a spotlight on STEM education. What’s the preparation to ride that tech wave? Every day brings a wider variety of topics we might study, but there’s one constant. The savviest consumers of STEM education all seek a solid foundation in computation. Continue Reading »Why College Park Doesn’t Lead in Computer Science Education

“Certainly necessary, but not sufficient”

By Joseph Auslander
Mathematics, Emeritus

DougFrederick Douglass statue at Hornbake Library Credit: John T. Consoli/University of Maryland

Frederick Douglass statue at Hornbake Library
Credit: John T. Consoli/University of Maryland

Several recent events on our campus have prompted me to think about some aspects of the history of the University of Maryland during my lengthy tenure here.

I came to Maryland in 1962. This was some years after the “Curly Byrd” era, but there were still some vestiges of it present. Ours was still very much a “southern campus.” For example, it was a noteworthy event when there were African American teaching assistants in the classroom, and there still were some departments that resisted it. And there was widespread housing discrimination in the area. Continue Reading »“Certainly necessary, but not sufficient”

Return to South Africa

By Dr. Johannes (Jannie) Botes
Associate Professor
University of Baltimore
Program on Negotiation and
Conflict Management

Dr. Jannie Botes Photo Courtesy UBalt

Dr. Jannie Botes
Photo Courtesy UBalt

The Fellowship

In the fall of 2014, I was honored to receive a Carnegie African Diaspora Fellowship Program (CADFP) award and spent four summer months in South Africa at the beginning of 2015.  I obtained a sabbatical from the University of Baltimore (UB) while teaching at the University of Stellenbosch, my alma mater.  I was also doing some research on South Africa’s National Development Plan (NDP) that is supposed to remedy a host of economic and societal problems by 2030. Continue Reading »Return to South Africa

A Conversation: Art, Art History, the Phillips…

Last October, the University of Maryland and the Phillips Collection announced a formal partnership.  The Faculty Voice invited Meredith Gill, the Chair of the Department of Art History and Archaeology, and  W.C. “Chip” Richardson, the Chair of the Department of Art, to discuss the implications of the affiliation for their departments, and the broader role of the arts at the University.  The conversation was recorded and has been edited for length and clarity.

FV What does the affiliation with the Phillips Collection mean to your departments?  What effect does it have?

MG Well, I think the first thing to say is that this is not simply a partnership that will have ramifications and very positive impact on the Department of Art History and Archaeology and the Department of Art but also on the campus more broadly. Continue Reading »A Conversation: Art, Art History, the Phillips…

Effectiveness and Efficiency at the University

By Dr. Donald Spicer

In addition to articles by faculty, The Faculty Voice occasionally publishes other articles which may be of general interest to the faculty. Dr. Donald Spicer is Associate Vice Chancellor for Information Technology and CIO of the University System of Maryland.  Public information about this initiative, including additional links, is available at: The USM “E&E 2.0” Initiative. The Faculty Voice welcomes responses to this article, and may publish some in future editions.

What are University System of Maryland (USM) institutions to do when state support is at best flat, raising tuition puts stress on students and their families, and all stakeholders—students, faculty, and legislators—have rising expectations regarding improving quality and access to higher education? The solution proposed by the USM Board of Regents (BOR) is to use available resources more effectively and efficiently, freeing up resources for new priorities. Continue Reading »Effectiveness and Efficiency at the University

News and Notes

Gender Effects on Authorship Credit

Recent research indicates that in some academic disciplines, the gender of one’s coauthors can have a significant effect on one’s career.  Justin Wolfer, in the Jan 8 online NY Times, summarizes the work of Heather Sarsons for her Harvard dissertation in economics (in a deliberately solo-authored paper):  “[In economics], [w]hen women write with men, their tenure prospects don’t improve at all. That is, women get essentially zero credit for the collaborative work with men. Papers written by women in collaboration with both a male and female co-author yield partial credit. It is only when women write with other women that they are given full credit. These differences are statistically significant… The bias that Ms. Sarsons documents is so large that it may account on its own for another statistic: Female economists are twice as likely to be denied tenure as their male colleagues.”  Wolfers supplements with some anecdotes, and refers to an earlier article of his documenting such a bias in the wider sphere, such as news coverage.  Sarsons notes the effect seems to be discipline dependent; she finds no such effect in the field of sociology, for example, and a couple of conjectured explanations are offered. Continue Reading »News and Notes

African Women in the Past Five Decades

By Gloria Chuku
Professor of Africana Studies and Affiliate Professor of Gender and Women’s Studies, and Language, Literacy and Culture Ph.D. Program at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County

Professor Gloria Chuku

Professor Gloria Chuku

*Part one of this article appeared in the last edition of  The Faculty Voice

Economic Sphere

The critical role of women in the economic growth and development of Africa in the past fifty years cannot be overemphasized. A majority of African women engaged in farming, informal sector street vending and petty trading, paid domestic work, house work and care-giving duties, and trans-national trade. Generally, African women worked longer hours than men but owned or received disproportionately less than them. The bulk of their work remained unpaid and poorly remunerated in spite of long working hours, a situation which had resulted in the feminization of poverty. In agrarian economies of Africa, women remained the primary cultivators. At least 70 percent of African rural women were involved in agriculture with concentration in food production and processing. Using simple, time-consuming and laborious implements, women spent more time in agricultural activities, either in their farms or husbands’ or in both; yet many of them lacked access to land, training, appropriate technologies and other agricultural resources. In order to supplement their subsistence production and whatever financial support they received from their husbands, some of the women also engaged in seasonal or casual wage labor in agro-industries in Cameroon, Cote d’Ivoire, Ghana, Liberia, Mozambique, and Nigeria, processing such crops as cocoa, cotton, corn, rubber, and palm oil and kernels. African women were therefore as crucial in export and raw material production as they were in the food sector. As men moved into agro-industrial and large-scale agricultural production, utilizing modern technologies and improved techniques, the majority of African women remained at subsistence and small-scale production with old rudimentary and time-consuming implements. This disparity has informed some to suggest that men’s monopolization of advanced technologies and access to capital and resources has increasingly marginalized African women in agricultural production and diminished their economic independence. But what is vital here is the reality of social stratification and differentiation at the household, village and societal levels and the imbalances in power relations which privileged men in terms of access to the means of production and the control of surplus or profit that came from added incentives to produce. While men controlled the means and benefits of agricultural production, African women were never excluded from productive labor nor did their workload decrease; rather male discriminatory practices denied women the opportunity to maximize their potential and the fruits of their labor. Continue Reading »African Women in the Past Five Decades

Images: Art and Art History at College Park

Art History’s Michele Smith Collaboratory for Visual Culture: Panel discussion—Comic Books and Graphic Novels as Literary and Visual Forms

Art History’s Michele Smith Collaboratory for Visual Culture: Panel discussion—Comic Books and Graphic Novels as Literary and Visual Forms

2105 Faculty Exhibition, University of Maryland Gallery

2015 Faculty Exhibition, University of Maryland Gallery

Professor John Ruppert. “Three Orbs.” Aluminum chain-link and stainless steel. 12’ by 16’ diameter, 2006. Installed at The Contemporary Art Museum of Estonia.

Professor John Ruppert. “Three Orbs.” Aluminum chain-link and stainless steel. 12’ by 16’ diameter, 2006. Installed at The Contemporary Art Museum of Estonia.

Professor W.C. Richardson. “In the Neighborhood.” Oil and alkyd on panel. 30” by 30”. 2015.

Professor W.C. Richardson. “In the Neighborhood.” Oil and alkyd on panel. 30” by 30”. 2015.

Professor W.C. Richardson. “In the Neighborhood.” Oil and alkyd on panel. 30” by 30”. 2015.

Professor W.C. Richardson. “In the Neighborhood.” Oil and alkyd on panel. 30” by 30”. 2015.

2015 Faculty Exhibition. From left to right: Brandon Morse, Patrick Craig (sculpture), Matt McLaughlin, W.C. Richardson.

2015 Faculty Exhibition. From left to right: Brandon Morse, Patrick Craig (sculpture), Matt McLaughlin, W.C. Richardson.

Art History’s Michele Smith Collaboratory for Visual Culture: Professor Meredith Gill leads students through the Sistine Chapel.

Art History’s Michele Smith Collaboratory for Visual Culture: Professor Meredith Gill leads students through the Sistine Chapel.

Works from 2015 Faculty Exhibition. From left to right: Hasan Elahi, Justin Strom, Emily Conover, Patrick Craig.

Works from 2015 Faculty Exhibition. From left to right: Hasan Elahi, Justin Strom, Emily Conover, Patrick Craig.

The Professor Who Ran Away

By Professor ‘X’

How it started

I was a newly-minted Ph.D. Just prior to graduation I had accepted a job with a large federal agency; one which actually did very good, cutting-edge, research. As graduation approached I was simultaneously looking for housing at the new location, getting ready for my defense, searching for a moving company….Upon graduation I used the short amount of downtime between my academic stint and my new role as public servant re-locating and trying to make the transition as smooth as possible. My selected agency was responsible for dealing with all aspects of air-travel: ground operations, controller operations, in-flight, airport capacity .…The division in which I would be working performed research into the measurement and understanding of wake-vortices. The phenomena of wake vortices directly affects how closely spaced two aircraft can be when approaching the runway for landing. This spacing in turn directly affects airport capacity. Continue Reading »The Professor Who Ran Away

Taking Health Communication to Zimbabwe

By James Gachau
Philip Merrill College of Journalism

Dr. Muhiuddin Haider, Clinical Professor in Global Health in the University of Maryland Institute for Applied Environmental Health and the Horowitz Center for Health Literacy, was featured on the home page of UMD’s website earlier this year for his work in global health. Dr. Haider possesses a unique and rare combination of skills which enables him to design health programs, sell those programs to communities and assess the behavioral and health changes that occur. The featured story was about his September 2014 mission to Zimbabwe, where he helped build the capacity of Zimbabwean journalists for better health communication. The Faculty Voice caught up with him earlier this semester for a sit-down interview to discuss how he acquired his own capacity for effective health communication. Continue Reading »Taking Health Communication to Zimbabwe

Bill Hanna, Social Activist, Humanitarian and Editor of The Faculty Voice

By Judith Hanna
Wife, Lover and Friend

Bill--obit photo

William John Hanna (Bill), resident of Bethesda, Maryland, was born in Cleveland and later moved to Los Angeles. He passed away from cancer and was buried in Hollywood Forever Cemetery near his parents’ graves. He did not want any funeral or memorial service. Continue Reading »Bill Hanna, Social Activist, Humanitarian and Editor of The Faculty Voice

Tribute to Bill Hanna

Brit Kirwan

Bill Hanna was a dear friend and valued colleague for over 30 years. I first met Bill while serving as Vice President and Provost. From the moment of our initial encounter, I was impressed by his dedication to building a stronger community both within and without the campus’ boundaries. Over the ensuing years, I benefitted enormously from his ability to offer forthright but always civil admonitions when he felt the administration had erred. Continue Reading »Tribute to Bill Hanna

Senryū by Robert Deluty, UMBC/Psychology

a sophomore
wondering what part of
speech is Zup

her right-wing Dad
regarding Vassar and Smith
as expensive cults Continue Reading »Senryū by Robert Deluty, UMBC/Psychology

News and Notes

Chinese Students

A startling number of Chinese students are getting kicked out of American colleges. According to a white paper published by WholeRen, a Pittsburgh-based consultancy, an estimated 8,000 students from China were expelled from universities and colleges across the United States in 2013-4. The vast majority of these students—around 80 percent—were removed due to cheating or failing their classes. As long as universities have existed, students have found a way to get expelled from them. Continue Reading »News and Notes

Book Notes

The Faculty Voice hopes to note the publication of books by faculty and staff members, so readers-authors are encouraged to send us the necessary information. In this issue, we note a book on the future of the arts.
Curtains? The Future of the Arts in America
By Michael M. Kaiser
Chairman of the DeVos Institute of Arts Management at the University of Maryland

51PjFH50ONL._SY344_BO1,204,203,200_

Image courtesy of amazon.com


Earlier this year, my book, Curtains? The Future of the Arts in America, was published by Brandeis University Press. The book reviews the history of arts institutions in this nation, examines the many factors that have been affecting these institutions in the past decade, and projects into future to ask: if prevailing trends continue, what will the arts ecology look like 20 years from now? Continue Reading »Book Notes

Dr. Maravene Loeschke, President, Towson University, 2012 – 2014

By Dean Esslinger
Professor Emeritus of History, Assoc. V.P. for International Education (Retired)
Towson University

InaugurationKT0091

Dr. Maravene Loeschke during her inauguration; photo courtesy Towson University

When Dr. Maravene Loeschke passed away on June 25 last summer, the University System of Maryland lost one of its best and most beloved university presidents. Chosen to succeed Dr. Robert Caret in 2012, President Loeschke’s tenure as the head of Towson University was cut short by cancer after only three years in office. Although her presidency was brief, her time at Towson covered 38 years and her impact on the University was significant. Continue Reading »Dr. Maravene Loeschke, President, Towson University, 2012 – 2014

The Underrepresentation of Women Teachers in Sub-Saharan Africa

By Nelly P. Stromquist
Professor, International Education Policy, UMCP

In countries with substantially fewer girls than boys in education, there is often a cycle of gender disparity that is difficult to break: few girls in school means few women teachers; few women teachers means few girls in school. Increasing the presence of women teachers in such countries has been found to promote girls’ enrollment and permanence in school, as parents trust women teachers and girl students have a role model. Continue Reading »The Underrepresentation of Women Teachers in Sub-Saharan Africa

Two Poems by Bill Hanna

The Waiting Room

Nine old men
Waiting for the doc
And one of those old men
Is me!

Maybe some day soon
There will be only eight
One by one we’ll disappear
We must obey our fate.

What am I to do?

My body feels like ninety,
My brain’s like thirty-two.
When one outlives the other,
What am I to do?